History through the eyes of faith

Important theological debates also surrounded the various Ecumenical Councils —Nicaea inConstantinople inEphesus in and Chalcedon in

History through the eyes of faith

Jun 11, Andrew Alkema rated it it was amazing Wells does an incredible job of analyzing Western history from a Christian perspective. He never judges the past based on those beliefs, only analyzes and makes very balance, interesting comments.

I really liked the quote: The historical task is about listening to the human conversation". Sep 19, Lena rated it liked it Had interesting information. Dec 01, Dave Courtney rated it really liked it 3 and a half stars Ronald A. Wells is upfront about how to use his book 'History Through the Eyes of Faith' as a supplement to mandatory texts in a history class.

As such it strays from being concise in its dealings, specifically, with the West and instead manages to navigate from detail to philosophy to speculation to proclamation.

History through the eyes of faith

There are points where you are left craving more of the philosophy and less detail, and others where the detail, at least for a casual reader who does not have an a 3 and a half stars Ronald A. There are points where you are left craving more of the philosophy and less detail, and others where the detail, at least for a casual reader who does not have an assisting history text open beside them, is needed to work through the philosophy.

This is a minor criticism though in what proves, certainly in its powerhouse final three chapters to be a worthwhile and provoking read on how to interpret history through the eyes of the Christian faith. What is immediately helpful to the process is in how Wells presents his clear and concise outline of Western civilization.

By looking back on the tendencies and realities that built the ancient Greco-Roman cultures, the Middles Ages, The Renaissance and the Romanticists, it appears to easy to ponder this information as we attempt to understand our current cultural surroundings.

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This is the wonderful part of studying history, so that we can better understand the world in which we live today. And it should come as no surprise to begin to see repetitive cycles at play. Wells cautions Christian readers over becoming moralistic in response, and indeed represents a humble process in which religion must be admitted to a natural progression from the majority stronghold and representation of political and national power to the minority expressions of a fragmented protestant-catholic tension.

History through the eyes of faith

This, he argues upfront, is the inevitable result of humanism, not the dissolve of religion which indeed did find a comfortable home in christian humanist expressionbut the growing dominance of secular humanism. This should humble our response even as it can move to anchor us in a more deeply held conviction about why faith belongs in the scope of human history.

There are a number of provoking and interesting angles Wells pursues, especially as he delves in to the more recent history of the last century.

Understanding the enlightenment as the belief in the progress of man as that which brings hope, we can see the remnants of a murky movement from rationalism to romanticism that have left their competing voices on the Western landscape.

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It is interesting to see the great events of our day stemming back to the Great War as following what is one of the most peaceful and progressive periods of American and Western civilization. It is illuminating to see how hope and hopelessness stand as such perilous notions especially when we see it through the emotional expression of this sort of teeter totter effect.

This is a worthwhile read for anyone interested in Western civilization, especially from a religious perspective.

It is not biased, but does stand up to lend its voice to where, as Christians, we need to experience and respond to history slightly different than secular humanists will tend to.

I appreciated this book quite a bit. It's not a a proper textbook that focused on dates and events, but one that focused more on themes and movements in thought throughout history. I liked this one because it was respectful of the fact that Christians have a unique viewpoint on history because of their faith, but that does not mean that other viewpoints are automatically wrong or worth being rejected.

I didn't like that the author seemed to ramble sometimes to try to get his point across. I had to reread a few sections several times to grasp his point. The one draw back is: Although the first chapter does consider some philosophy of history, it does so in a quick and rushed manner. Mar 31, Joe Paulk rated it liked it This book is actually easy to read and lacks any density It's more of an apology or guideline for thinking of history in a way that makes it more palatable for a Christian viewpoint.Integrating faith with introductory Western history, this text provides a Christian perspective on the major epochs, issues, and events of Western Civilization.

It details the role of the Greeks and Hebrews, Jesus in history, the Renaissance, and more. Study History Through the Eyes of Faith: Christian College Coalition Series discussion and chapter questions and find History Through the Eyes of Faith: Christian College Coalition Series study guide questions and answers.

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History Through the Eyes of Faith By Ronald A. Wells CHAPTER ONE: AN INVITATION TO HISTORY: A CHRISTIAN CALLING This is a Christian book. By Christian I mean that a Christian wrote it primarily for Christians. Nonbelievers are welcome to listen to the discussion to follow, and they may even benefit from it.

History Through the Eyes of Faith: Christian College Coalition Series [Ronald A Wells] on ashio-midori.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Integrating faith with introductory Western history, this text provides a Christian perspective on the major epochs.

From the Editor. As John Kinder reminds us, last year was the th anniversary of the birth of Dante Alighieri, the author of the Divine Comedy.

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